FINLAND FREAKOUT 1971 - Pink Fairies (Major League Productions)
It is what it says it is: Raw and crude power, arcing like electricity over some Finnish field.

It's a document of an August 1971 set at the Ruisrock Festival - Finland's first rock fest - in Turku, produced by The Finnish Broadcasting Company.

"Finland Freakout 1971" shows the three-piece line-up, post-Twink, in all their excessive glory. Paul Rudolph sprays shotgun guitar pellets over a dense bedrock laid down by drummer Russell Hunter and bass player Duncan Sanderson, all of them wired on meth. No trimmings or embellishments, just big, rumbling rock and roll.

It's a 45-minute set that last just four songs, the centrepiece of which is a blistering, 20-minute forced march through "Uncle Harry's Last Freakout." Rudolph intones: "Everybody should be so happy" - and they probably should have been if they hadn't been struck deaf by the sonic onslaught. Polite as they are, odds are the crowd were already reeling from a crushing opening one-two combo of "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "The Snake."

Dulling, heavy chording brings Uncle Harry back to earth before the band makes a break for it in the outro.

The band's "world renowned" trademark "Walk Don't Run" kicks things up a notch as Hunter ramps up the beat after a quizzical "love and peace to you all" greeting from Rudolph. The guitar and bass kick in and we're off on a damaged 13-minute trip.

Sound quality is excellent with none of the clipping you expect from FM broadcasts. The bass is oppressively heavy - and it should be - but not at the expense of the cymbals and hi-hat. Guitar surges through the middle-soundscape.

While I love the Fairies' studio albums for being 'orrible and 'eavy, this might end up my favourite. - The Barman

 

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